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Though the Aria cases stretch back almost to the Dec.16, 2009, grand opening of the 4,000-room hotel, officials say they need to notify only those guests who stayed during the recent two-week period because of the disease’s incubation period of two to 14 days.He said the district has conducted water tests on fewer than 15 rooms, and the Aria is doing tests of its own on water outlets in other rooms.A ‘UBIQUITOUS ORGANISM’ CDC’s specialists Garrison and Laurie Hicks called Legionella a "ubiquitous organism" that can be found in many locations, including in natural as well as artificial water systems.So far, none of the notified patrons, nor any hotel employees, has reported contracting the disease, according to the health district’s Jennifer Sizemore.The notification letter informs people of symptoms and advises them to seek medical attention if they feel ill.

Even as the Aria was being inspected in 2010, another report of a possible case linked to the hotel came to the health district from the CDC.Yet given what Bergtholdt and other environmental specialists found during the inspection at the Aria — what appeared to be complete compliance with guidelines — the determination was made not to test the water."If we had found anything to suggest that they had a breeding ground for Legionella, we would have tested water for it," Bergtholdt said. And officials, he admitted, are conscious of the cost of testing. "Just one room of faucets and showers and so forth can cost

Even as the Aria was being inspected in 2010, another report of a possible case linked to the hotel came to the health district from the CDC.

Yet given what Bergtholdt and other environmental specialists found during the inspection at the Aria — what appeared to be complete compliance with guidelines — the determination was made not to test the water.

"If we had found anything to suggest that they had a breeding ground for Legionella, we would have tested water for it," Bergtholdt said. And officials, he admitted, are conscious of the cost of testing. "Just one room of faucets and showers and so forth can cost $1,000.

The tests were done only after health officials determined that six former patrons of the hotel had been diagnosed with the disease, a form of pneumonia.

And that, says a CDC official, is the proper protocol.

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Even as the Aria was being inspected in 2010, another report of a possible case linked to the hotel came to the health district from the CDC.Yet given what Bergtholdt and other environmental specialists found during the inspection at the Aria — what appeared to be complete compliance with guidelines — the determination was made not to test the water."If we had found anything to suggest that they had a breeding ground for Legionella, we would have tested water for it," Bergtholdt said. And officials, he admitted, are conscious of the cost of testing. "Just one room of faucets and showers and so forth can cost $1,000.The tests were done only after health officials determined that six former patrons of the hotel had been diagnosed with the disease, a form of pneumonia.And that, says a CDC official, is the proper protocol.

,000.The tests were done only after health officials determined that six former patrons of the hotel had been diagnosed with the disease, a form of pneumonia.And that, says a CDC official, is the proper protocol.

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